Tag Archives: Seattle

Dr. Wilda Reviews: Seattle Art Museum’s Indigenous Beauty

18 Feb

Moi recently attended the press preview of Seattle Art Museum’s (SAM) exhibit Indigenous Beauty. Here are the exhibit details:

Indigenous Beauty
Feb 12 – May 17 2015
Seattle Art Museum
Simonyi Special Exhibition Galleries

SAM describes the exhibit with the headline, “Experience the First Art of North America.” The Native Peoples of North America belong to many cultural groups and lived in the United States, Canada and Mexico. Indigenous Peoples is an attempt to give a flavor of the many cultures by organizing the art according to geographic region. The Native Peoples used the materials and resources that each region provided.

The America Federation of Arts, SAM and other supporters helped bring a sample of the Diker Collection to Seattle, Fort Worth, Atlanta and Toledo. The Diker Collection has been displayed at both the Smithsonian and Metropolitan Museums. Deborah Donovan wrote in a 2009 review of First American Art: The Charles and Valerie Diker Collection of American Indian Art:

The Dikers also have an extensive collection of modern and contemporary art in their home, and it was there that the curators of this exhibit, Native and non-Native scholars alike, came together to discuss the meanings of Native art.

Inspired by the unique juxtapositioning before them of historical Indian art with modern art-an Acoma olla placed on a table beneath two huge Jean Dubuffets and a colorful Calder mobile, for instance-the curators organized their discussion around seven aesthetic principles common to both: idea, emotion, intimacy, movement, integrity, vocabulary, and composition…. https://www.forewordreviews.com/reviews/first-american-art/

Given the breadth of the Native experience in North America, this carefully curated exhibit provides examples of the very best of Native artistry and craft. The artists and that is what they were, whether the genesis of their work arose from an expression of their spirit or just a need to create, demonstrate exceptional workmanship. Keep in mind; the artists used the materials they had available. Each piece in the exhibit tells a story about an aspect of the Native experience. Some of the stories may have been lost in the attempt to force assimilation on some of the cultures, but contemporary Native tribal members are attempting to recover the stories.

Indigenous People is simply stunning and a great education experience for all ages. It is worth traveling to one of the venues to breathe in the exceptional artistic and spiritual experience. Dr. Wilda gives Indigenous People a thumbs up.

Educational Resources:

Bibliography
http://www.seattleartmuseum.org/Bibliographies/Bib_DikerCollection.pdf

Indigenous Beauty Educator Resource List
http://www.seattleartmuseum.org/Documents/Indigenous%20Beauty%20Educator%20Resource%20List.pdf

Explore the regions
Western Arctic / eastern subarctic / northwest coast / great basin & california / southwest / plateau & plains / woodlands & southeast
http://www.seattleartmuseum.org/exhibitions/indigenous

Here is the SAM press release:

Indigenous Beauty
Feb 12 – May 17 2015
Seattle Art Museum
Simonyi Special Exhibition Galleries
Get Tickets
This spring, Seattle has the opportunity to see some of the most stunning works of American Indian art ever made.
Marvel at nearly 2,000 years of amazing skill and invention. Linger over drawings, sculptures, baskets, beaded regalia, and masks.
The immense variety of Indigenous Beauty: Masterworks of American Indian Art from the Diker Collection reflects the diversity of Native cultures. This superb exhibition offers more than great works of art and cultural artifacts—it is an invitation to explore other worlds.
Deeply engaged with cultural traditions and the land, indigenous artists over the centuries have used art to represent and preserve their ways of life. Even during the 19th and 20th centuries, when drastic changes were brought by colonization, artists brilliantly adapted their talents and used the new materials available to them to marvelous effect.
The works in Indigenous Beauty will inspire wonder, curiosity, and delight. Come experience the vast beauty of indigenous art from all across North America.
The guest curator for this exhibition is David Penney. Local curator is Barbara Brotherton, Curator of Native American Art at the Seattle Art Museum.
Indigenous Beauty: Masterworks of American Indian Art from the Diker Collection is organized by the American Federation of Arts. This exhibition was made possible by the generosity of an anonymous donor, the JFM Foundation, and Mrs. Donald M. Cox.

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Dr. Wilda Reviews Seattle Art Museum upcoming 2015 -2016 season: SAM wants to be YOUR museum

16 Nov

Moi joined other media and supporters of Seattle Art Museum (SAM) for a complimentary lunch at the Triple Door which was catered by Wild Ginger. There was an air of anticipation in the crowd about what was next on the SAM agenda. The 2014 season had been very successful with international shows like Peru: Kingdoms of the Sun and the Moon http://seattleartmuseum.org/exhibitions/peru The curator staff at SAM seems to be both imaginative and resourceful. Given the stratospheric prices art is going for at auction, the question is how resourceful and creative could the SAM staff be? The answer which came during the event was the SAM staff was just as resourceful as ever and they are making an attempt to be Seattle’s art museum by appealing to many different segments of the community.

There was the announcement that the Virginia and Bagley Wright Collection gift to SAM’s permanent collection will be on display:

In celebration of this gift, SAM will be featuring highlights of the collection throughout the modern and contemporary galleries beginning in the spring of 2015. In addition, the museum is organizing a major exhibition for the summer of 2016 that will feature abstract works from the Wright Collection as well as works in the SAM collection and other key loans….http://www.seattleartmuseum.org/about-sam/press-room/the-wright-collection-of-modern-and-contemporary-art-comes-to-seattle-art-museum

This gift is the backbone which will enhance exhibits like Pop Departures. http://www.seattleartmuseum.org/exhibitions/pop and City Dwellers which showcases contemporary art from India. http://www.seattleartmuseum.org/Exhibitions/Details?EventId=27436 Future contemporary exhibits have a wonderful platform from which to launch. SAM is blessed with three great venues, SAM Downtown, Olympic Sculpture Park, and the Asian Museum at Volunteer Park. All three venues have some exciting exhibits coming up. Sam Vernon will be at Olympic Sculpture Park from Mar 28 2015 – Mar 6 2016 http://www.seattleartmuseum.org/Exhibitions/Details?EventId=28606

At the Asian Art Museum, there are two exhibits of note in addition to the permanent collection. Live On: Mr.’s Japanese Neo-Pop will be on view from Nov 22 2014 – Apr 5 2015 in Tateuchi Galleries. Japanese artist, Chiho Aoshima will have an exhibit from April 25 – October 4, 2015. http://www.artspace.com/chiho_aoshima

Here are the highlights of the upcoming season:

  1. Native American Art

Indigenous Beauty

Feb 12 – May 17 2015

Seattle Art Museum

Simonyi Special Exhibition Galleries                                                                                                           http://www.seattleartmuseum.org/exhibitions/indigenous

  1. Native Coast Art

Seattle Collects Northwest Coast Native Art

Feb 12 – May 17 2015

Seattle Art Museum

Simonyi Special Exhibition Galleries                                                                                                             http://www.seattleartmuseum.org/Exhibitions/Details?EventId=27983

  1. Global African Art

Disguise: Masks and Global African Art

Jun 18 – Sep 7 2015

Seattle Art Museum

Simonyi Special Exhibition Galleries

http://www.seattleartmuseum.org/exhibitions/disguise

  1. Impressionism

Intimate Impressionism from the National Gallery of Art

Oct 1 2015 – Jan 10 2016

Seattle Art Museum

Simonyi Special Exhibition Galleries                                                                                                                        http://www.seattleartmuseum.org/Exhibitions/Details?EventId=27987

  1. Samuel F.B. Morse

Samuel F.B. Morse’s Gallery of the Louvre

Sep 16 2015 – Jan 10 2016

Seattle Art Museum

Third Floor Galleries                                                                                                                                           http://www.seattleartmuseum.org/Exhibitions/Details?EventId=27988

  1. Kehinde Wiley

Kehinde Wiley: A New Republic

Feb 11 – May 8 2016

Seattle Art Museum

Simonyi Special Exhibition Galleries                                                                                                         http://www.seattleartmuseum.org/Exhibitions/Details?EventId=29707

  1. Seeing Nature

Seeing Nature

Feb 16 – May 21 2017

Seattle Art Museum

Simonyi Special Exhibition Galleries

Co-organized by the Seattle Art Museum, the Portland Art Museum, and the Paul G. Allen Family Collection, Seeing Nature: Landscape Masterworks from the Paul G. Allen Family Collection

http://www.seattleartmuseum.org/Exhibitions/Details?EventId=30737

The headline from the SAM preview is SAM wants to be YOUR museum. The upcoming exhibits have a strong ethnic component and hopefully will draw crowds that don’t necessarily come to SAM. Through loans, guest curators and strong collaboration, SAM is assembling art works which show very good examples of an art theme and there are various themes for the upcoming season. For those who don’t live in Seattle, but who may be planning a trip, you might want to come during an exhibit time.

The 2015 – 2016 and beyond season is definitely a thumbs up.

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The 12/04/13 Joy Jar

5 Dec

Moi was walking through Seattle Center tonight. The City of Seattle describes Seattle Center:

First built for the 1962 World’s Fair, the 74 acre Seattle Center campus is located just north of downtown Seattle, and offers everyone a fairground, park, and arts and entertainment center all year round.
Journey skyward for a 360 degree view of Puget Sound from the Space Needle, hop on the Monorail for an elevated glide to downtown Seattle, or cavort in the shooting waters of the International Fountain.
Enjoy science and culture at the Pacific Science Center, sports and concerts at KeyArena, ballet and opera at McCaw Hall, world and classic film at SIFF Cinema, and exciting plays and events at the Seattle Repertory Theatre.
Other attractions include the shops and restaurants of the Center House, The Children’s Museum, the Experience Music Project and the Science Fiction Museum, and the Intiman Playhouse. Seattle Center hosts hundreds of festivals each year, including the music festival Bumbershoot, the Northwest Folklife Festival,… https://www.seattle.gov/tour/center.htm

Like most of downtown Seattle, Seattle Center has Christmas lights everywhere and that gives the Center a magical feel. Today’s deposit into the ‘Joy Jar’ are the Christmas lights which herald the Christmas season.

Christmas waves a magic wand over this world, and behold, everything is softer and more beautiful.
Norman Vincent Peale

There has been only one Christmas – the rest are anniversaries.
W.J. Cameron

“The whole of Paris was lit up. The tiny dancing flames had bespangled the sea of darkness from end to end of the horizon, and now, like millions of stars, they burned with a steady light in the serene summer night. There was no breath of wind to make them flicker as they hung there in space. They made the unseen city seem as vast as a firmament, reaching out into infinity.”
Émile Zola, Une page d’amour

The sincere friends of this world are as ship lights in the stormiest of nights.
Giotto di Bondone

There are dark shadows on the earth, but its lights are stronger in the contrast.
Charles Dickens

The light of lights looks always on the motive, not the deed, the shadow of shadows on the deed alone.
William Butler Yeats

A great attitude does much more than turn on the lights in our worlds; it seems to magically connect us to all sorts of serendipitous opportunities that were somehow absent before the change.
Earl Nightingale

I love Christmas, not just because of the presents but because of all the decorations and lights and the warmth of the season.
Ashley Tisdale

We say God and the imagination are one… How high that highest candle lights the dark.
Wallace Stevens

Blessed is the season which engages the whole world in a conspiracy of love!
Hamilton Wright Mabie

The 11/20/13 Joy Jar

20 Nov

It is officially not winter in Seattle, but it is a cold clear day with some of the bluest skies around.

Seattle

The bluest skies you’ve ever seen are in Seattle
And the hills the greenest green, in Seattle
Like a beautiful child, growing up, free an’ wild
Full of hopes an’ full of fears, full of laughter, full of tears
Full of dreams to last the years, in Seattle
. . . in Seattle!

When it’s time to leave your home and your loved ones
It’s the hardest thing a boy can ever do
An’ you pray that you will find
someone warm an’ sweet an’ kind
But you’re not sure what’s waiting there for you!

The bluest skies you’ve ever seen are in Seattle
And the hills the greenest green, in Seattle
Like a beautiful child, growing up, free an’ wild
Full of hopes an’ full of fears, full of laughter, full of tears
Full of dreams to last the years, in Seattle
. . . in Seattle!
http://www.kokomo.ca/pop_standards/seattle_lyrics.htm

Today’s deposit into the ‘Joy Jar’ is the blue sky in Seattle.

“If the sight of the blue skies fills you with joy, if a blade of grass springing up in the fields has power to move you, if the simple things in nature have a message you understand, Rejoice, for your soul is alive.”
Eleanora Duse quotes (Italian Actress. 1858-1924)

“Somewhere over the rainbow, skies are blue, and the dreams that you dare to dream really do come true”

Lyman Frank Baum

“I thank you God for this most amazing day, for the leaping greenly spirits of trees, and for the blue dream of sky and for everything which is natural, which is infinite, which is yes.”
E. E. Cummings

“Oh! `darkly, deeply, beautifully blue’, / As someone somewhere sings about the sky.”
Lord Byron

“People usually consider walking on water or in thin air a miracle. But I think the real miracle is not to walk either on water or in thin air, but to walk on earth. Every day we are engaged in a miracle which we don’t even recognize: a blue sky, white clouds, green leaves, the black, curious eyes of a child — our own two eyes. All is a miracle.”
Thich Nhat Hanh

“In thinking of America, I sometimes find myself admiring her bright blue sky-her grand old woods-her fertile fields-her beautiful rivers-her mighty lakes and star-crowned mountains. But my rapture is soon checked when I remember that all is cursed with the infernal spirit of slave-holding and wrong; When I remember that with the waters of her noblest rivers, the tears of my brethren are borne to the ocean, disregarded and forgotten; That her most fertile fields drink daily of the warm blood of my outraged sisters, I am filled with unutterable loathing.”
Frederick Douglass

“Arithmetic is where the answer is right and everything is nice and you can look out of the window and see the blue sky – or the answer is wrong and you have to start over and try again and see how it comes out this time.”
Carl Sandburg

“Give me the clear blue sky above my head, and the green turf beneath my feet, a winding road before me, and a three hours’ march to dinner – and then to thinking! It is hard if I cannot start some game on these lone heaths.”
William Hazlitt

“Saints will aid if men will call: / For the blue sky bends over all!”
Samuel Taylor Coleridge

“By reading the scriptures I am so renewed that all nature seems renewed around me and with me. The sky seems to be a pure, a cooler blue, the trees a deeper green. The whole world is charged with the glory of God and I feel fire and music under my feet.”
Thomas Merton

Dr. Wilda Reviews Seattle Art Museum’ 2014 – 2015 seasons: SAM is at a fork in the road

19 Nov

Moi was pleased to be included in Seattle Art Museum’s (SAM) preview of the 2014 – 2015 seasons. Media from all over the region gathered for lunch at the Triple Door. Lunch was provided courtesy of the Triple Door and Wild Ginger. The 2014 – 2014 season has what is now mandatory, a knock-your-socks major exhibit or two, a nod to the ethnic diversity of the region, an example or two of art mediums other than painting as well as the grand installation at the Sculpture Park. The headline is that SAM produces another stunning season, it won’t disappoint. The backstory is that SAM is at a fork in the road. It is hard to say about an institution, like SAM, who has been in existence over 85 years, what do you really want to be when you grow up, but that is the question at this moment in SAM’s history. This review has two parts, the review of the 2014 – 2015 season and some of the challenges faced by museums like SAM. Executive Director, Kimerly Rorschach disclosed that SAM will be starting the planning to produce a five year strategic plan and that Barney A. Ebsworth has given SAM a major piece, Echo for the Sculpture Garden. This gift highlights one of SAM’s major challenges, its acquisition budget.

Among the upcoming exhibits at SAM are:

William Cordova

September 20, 2013–January 19, 2014

Robert Davidson: Abstract Impulse

November 16, 2013–February 16, 2014

Leo Berk: 2013 Betty Bowen Award Winner

November 7, 2013–February 23, 2014

From Abstract Expression to Colored Planes

March 16, 2013–November 9, 2014

Light in the Darkness

A Fuller View of China, Japan and Korea

August 10, 2013–April 13, 2014

Hometown Boy

Liu Xiaodong

August 31, 2013–June 29, 2014

Inked

Wan Qingli

August 31, 2013–June 29, 2014

Sandra Cinto

Encontro das Águas (Encounter of Waters)

April 14, 2012–February 17, 2014

Miró: The Experience of Seeing

February 13–May 25, 2014

DECO JAPAN: Shaping Art and Culture, 1920–1945

May 10–October 19, 2014

This is just a sample of what is coming. Other exhibits of note include La Toya Ruby Frazier’s photographs, City Dwellers: Contemporary Art from India, and Intimate Impressionism from the National Gallery of Art. Upcoming events can be found at http://www.seattleartmuseum.org/exhibit/exhibit.asp

Despite the dazzle, SAM’s strategic plan has to examine some serious issues. A 2008 blog post by Ross Dawson examined some of the issues.

In Thinking about the future of museums: fourteen key issues, Dawson opined:

Below are fourteen key issues in the future of museums.
What is a museum?
On the face of it, a museum records and makes accessible artefacts the past that have cultural value. The curatorial process is one of showing people things that enrich them. Museums need to have a clear idea of why they exist. In most cases (in addition to any financial imperatives) the objective is to benefit society, by educating and creating culturally richer and more well-rounded members of society.
Entertainment vs. education and onto experience.
Entertainment and education are quite different intents, but they can be integrated to achieve both aims. Certainly the demand from younger people has shifted strongly to only paying attention if content is truly entertaining. Beyond that, museums are fundamentally about providing experiences. People will seek engaging and powerful experiences, and if museums can provide them, their can fulfil their roles.
Complement formal education.
Recent developments of school and adult education have not kept pace with external change. There is in particular an important role for experiences that help prepare people for the future.
Speed of response.
Exhibitions are a slow medium, often taking 6 months or far more to put together. This means that any exhibit will be historical rather than truly contemporary. As people grow used to a faster informational cycle, ways of bringing together information quickly in a meaningful way is often required to engage people.
Being credible and authoritative.
In a world of infinite information, people are looking for credible sources. The brand and identity of a museum can assist in being a preferred source of information.
Physical vs. Virtual.
A museum is in almost all cases a physical space with physical exhibits. Yet access can also be provided online, including in three dimensional worlds. It is not a question of choosing between them, or even doing both. Rather the issue is how to integrate both physical and virtual so they complement each other.
Potential for geolocational tagging.
As a specific form of integrating the physical and virtual, I think geolocation is a very useful technology. This can for example enable visitors to geo-tag exhibits, making their comments visible to others moving through the physical space. Video glasses or mobile devices can allow people to pick up on and add to conversations about what they are seeing and interacting with.
Engaging younger generations.
Today schoolchildren going on a museum visit often do their reports by typing notes and taking pictures on their mobile phone. However they are far from passive consumers, and unless you allow them to be active in engaging with content, you will lose them.
Getting museum experts to interface directly with users.
The existing interface between the knowledge of the museum staff and users is the exhibit. Social media and social networks are ways to enable this more direct connection, interaction, and knoweldge sharing.
Energizing the community.
Because museums touch so many schoolchildren, they have an opportunity to engage them far beyond their visits. MIT’s ThinkCycle, which takes an open source approach to designing solutions to problems thaat touch many underprivileged people.
Helping people to answer new and important questions.
Therapeutical cloning, genetically modified food, embryonic genetic modification, are all new technologies that we as individuals and a society must work out how to respond. A museum can help people to understand these issues to help people to make up their own minds in an informed way.
Moving from gatekeepers to enabling access and building communities.
Not so long ago museums were essentially gatekeepers, choosing from all of the wonderful things they have access to, which will be on display. Now that access can be provided digitally, the issue becomes more one of making these valuable resources more accessible and visible, and building communities to share perspectives.
Museums as media organizations.
During the discussions it struck me that museums are basically media organizations, providing and editing (i.e. curating) content. Exactly the same issues apply, including that of whether to control or open out the editorial process.
From interacting with exhibits to interacting with people.
A great interactive exhibit is one that makes people visiting the museum to interact with each other. There are many fabulous technologies that can take the old push-button style of interactive exhibits into an entirely new dimension. However building live and asynchronous social networks on many levels is really where interactivity needs to go. Both stimulating and enabling conversations is where museum interactivity needs to go.
I think the issues facing museums are extremely interesting, and relevant across a far broader domain, as they fundamentally deal with the intersection of the virtual and physical in our experiences. Despite the rise of the virtual, there is extraordinary value in physical artefacts. To move into the future we absolutely need to understand and draw on our past. Physical objects are the crystallized manifestations of our collective thoughts and history. Museums are on an extraordinary journey which will see many thrive, and often look very different to how they do today. http://rossdawsonblog.com/weblog/archives/2008/05/thinking_about.html

So, SAM literally has to decide what does it want to be when it grows up.

Looking at attendance figures, SAM is one of the top museums in the country. See, Top 100 Arts and Culture Museum Ranking https://sites.google.com/site/silviaresanswers/Home/top-100-arts-and-culture-museum-ranking According to the Art Career Project, SAM is number six in the list of 30 Must-See Art Museums In The U.S:

6. Seattle Art Museum – Seattle, Wash.
The museum actually owns and operates three separate facilities, including the main museum, the Asian Art Museum located in the city’s Capitol Hill, and the Olympic Sculpture Park on the waterfront. All three are tremendous visits and are home to some magnificent works of art. The collection has more than 20,000 works and few museums can boast such a impressive array of different types, from every corner of the world.
Three to see:
Olympic Sculpture Park
Not only is the scenery surrounding the park a breathtaking sight to behold, but admission is free and the sculptures on display are awe-inspiring. The Eagle by Alexander Calder may be the most famous part of the collection, but don’t miss the Eye Benches, some of the most unique sculptures you will ever see.
The Art Ladder
Chances are if you visit the museum, you can’t miss the “Art Ladder” and its monstrous statues. Just make sure not to pass them by so quickly. The area is free to walk around and the statues are impressive in their size and craftsmanship.
Colors of the Oasis
http://www.theartcareerproject.com/30-must-see-art-museums-in-the-u-s/1044/#sthash.UG2EJ89g.ZPNuo6C5.dpuf

SAM is nationally and internationally recognized for the quality of its presentations, so why this fork in the road talk?

Christopher Knight wrote in the 2007 LA Times article, With new space, Seattle Art Museum expands its vision:

When the Seattle Art Museum turns 75 next year, it intends to be not only the most important general art museum in the Pacific Northwest but to be nationally prominent too. It might just get its wish…

The museum’s regional rank has been secure for years, but mostly by default. The competition is slim.

Even now, if your idea of a first-rate general art museum is one that’s stuffed with European painting and sculpture dating from ancient Greece and Rome to the rambunctious launch of the 20th century, the Seattle Art Museum is not for you. Two of its long-standing strengths are African art and Northwest coastal Native American art. The small European collection is mostly mediocre and not remotely comprehensive. There’s great porcelain, but you won’t find a Picasso painting.

If you’re willing to shift conventional expectations, though, you’ll discover a museum that has been smartly rethinking itself in recent years. What’s new is this larger aspiration….

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/la-et-seattleart2may02,0,4475141.story#axzz2l2RvTWDM

Back in 2007 SAM had big aspirations, now the question is where are those aspirations leading?

Charity Navigator has some very interesting information about SAM. Here is some balance sheet information:

Income Statement (FYE 06/2012)

REVENUE

Contributions

Contributions, Gifts & Grants

$5,768,913

Federated Campaigns

$447,253

Membership Dues

$4,897,027

Fundraising Events

$438,145

Related Organizations

$294,013

Government Grants

$403,865

Total Contributions

$12,249,216

Program Service Revenue

$4,242,610

Total Primary Revenue

$16,491,826

Other Revenue

$8,023,516

TOTAL REVENUE

$24,515,342

EXPENSES

Program Expenses

$21,173,594

Administrative Expenses

$11,769,768

Fundraising Expenses

$2,482,792

TOTAL FUNCTIONAL EXPENSES

$35,426,154

Payments to Affiliates

$0

Excess (or Deficit) for the year

$-10,910,812

Net Assets

$240,796,053

See the full report at http://www.charitynavigator.org/index.cfm?bay=search.summary&orgid=4449#.UosW_B7Tldh

Judith Dobrzynski wrote in the New York Times article, How an Acquisition Fund Burnishes Reputations:

Although acquiring art is a core mission, private collectors donate 80 to 90 percent of what is on view in American art museums. Fewer than two dozen museums have sizable nest eggs to buy the art they choose.

A few more, notably the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles and the Kimbell Art Museum in Fort Worth, are wealthy enough to buy steadily by drawing on unrestricted endowments, but have no special funds for acquisitions. Most of the time, when art museums find an object they desire, “we find someone who’s willing to support that acquisition,” said Dan L. Monroe, director of the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Mass.

In lean times like these, when museums are budgeting to the razor’s edge, those with pools for art purchases enjoy a distinct advantage — they are not permitted to use the money, usually about 5 percent of the principal each year, for anything but buying art…

Who has money set aside for buying art, and who does not, has more to do with a museum’s benefactors than with its size or location. The Currier Museum of Art in Manchester, N.H., has more than four times what the Seattle Museum of Art has: $35 million versus less than $7.8 million. That is because Henry Melville Fuller, a trustee, upon his death in 2001 left the Currier $43 million, half designated for the art purchase fund….http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/15/arts/artsspecial/a-fund-for-buying-art-burnishes-collections-and-reputations.html?emc=eta1&_r=0

In terms of acquisitions, the question for most museums is how do we get there from here?

SAM is a much loved institution in Seattle and the upcoming strategic plan analysis must look at a number of issues, but most important is where does the museum go as it looks ahead to the next 85 years.

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COMMENTS FROM AN OLD FART©

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Dr. Wilda Reviews Seattle Art Museum’ 2014 – 2015 seasons: SAM is at a fork in the road

The 10/05/13 Joy Jar

5 Oct

Today is a fabulous Fall day in Seattle. The sun is shining and there is a bit of underlying chill in the air. Passed by a building and there were dozens on birds on the roof just chillin. They almost looked like they needed sunglasses, but they were cool anyway. Today’s deposit into the “Joy Jar’ is the birds chillin on the roof.

It may be hard for an egg to turn into a bird: it would be a jolly sight harder for it to learn to fly while remaining an egg. We are like eggs at present. And you cannot go on indefinitely being just an ordinary, decent egg. We must be hatched or go bad.
C. S. Lewis

Intelligence without ambition is a bird without wings.
Salvador Dali

Faith is the bird that feels the light when the dawn is still dark.
Rabindranath Tagore

A bird doesn’t sing because it has an answer, it sings because it has a song.
Lou Holtz

I am no bird; and no net ensnares me; I am a free human being with an independent will.
Charlotte Bronte

Be like the bird who, pausing in her flight awhile on boughs too slight, feels them give way beneath her, and yet sings, knowing she hath wings.
Victor Hugo

Hold fast to dreams, for if dreams die, life is a broken-winged bird that cannot fly.
Langston Hughes

No bird soars too high if he soars with his own wings.
William Blake

I’d rather learn from one bird how to sing than to teach ten thousand stars how not to dance.
e. e. cummings

It’s best to have failure happen early in life. It wakes up the Phoenix bird in you so you rise from the ashes.
Anne Baxter

The 09/22/13 Joy Jar

22 Sep

Seattle is a city with hills and there is not agreement about how many. History Link reports:

Points of Conjecture
There is no firm agreement on which hills were counted to arrive at the original “seven,” but the main candidates are:
• First Hill, also called “Profanity Hill” because of the cursing indulged in by climbers of its steep flank. It rises east of downtown Seattle, and was the city’s first true residential neighborhood.
• Second Hill, also called Renton Hill after Capt. William Renton, who owned and logged the Central Area ridge roughly along 17th Avenue.
• Denny Hill, which stood immediately north of Pine Street and was flattened in the early 1900s to create the Denny Regrade.
• Capitol Hill, northwest of downtown and named by developer James Moore in 1900 to promote sales of luxury homes near Volunteer Park.
• Yesler or Profanity Hill (actually part of First Hill), original site of the King County Courthouse and now Harborview Hospital at Jefferson and 9th Avenue. Legend holds that it was named by the lawyers who had to trudge up Yesler Way’s steep slope from their Pioneer Square offices before a cable car line was installed in 1887.
• Beacon Hill, south of downtown. Although first settled in 1851, the ridge was not formally named until 1899, when developer and M. Harwood Young christened it after Beacon Hill in his hometown of Boston, Massachusetts.
• Queen Anne Hill, originally called Temperance Hill due to a high number of teetotalers who lived there, and now known for the prevailing architectural style of its early homes.
Some accounts substitute Magnolia Bluff, Sunset Hill, Duwamish Head and/or West Seattle Hill, which rises to 522 feet above sea level at 35th Avenue SW and SW Myrtle Street and is the city’s tallest natural point. Many other highlands could be included, but then the total would no longer add up to a romantic seven…..http://www.historylink.org/index.cfm?DisplayPage=output.cfm&File_Id=4131

Today’s deposit into the ‘Joy Joy” is the hills of Seattle.

We shall defend our island, whatever the cost may be, we shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender.
Winston Churchill

Whatever I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia, the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit together at the table of brotherhood.
Martin Luther King, Jr.

Able After climbing a great hill, one only finds that there are many more hills to climb.
Nelson Mandela

I have nothing new to teach the world. Truth and Non-violence are as old as the hills. All I have done is to try experiments in both on as vast a scale as I could.
Mahatma Gandhi

Where is the justice of political power if it executes the murderer and jails the plunderer, and then itself marches upon neighboring lands, killing thousands and pillaging the very hills?
Khalil Gibran

There is a sacred horror about everything grand. It is easy to admire mediocrity and hills; but whatever is too lofty, a genius as well as a mountain, an assembly as well as a masterpiece, seen too near, is appalling.
Victor Hugo

Now suddenly there was nothing but a world of cloud, and we three were there alone in the middle of a great white plain with snowy hills and mountains staring at us; and it was very still; but there were whispers.
Black Elk

Like stones rolling down hills, fair ideas reach their objectives despite all obstacles and barriers. It may be possible to speed or hinder them, but impossible to stop them.
Jose Marti

Territory is but the body of a nation. The people who inhabit its hills and valleys are its soul, its spirit, its life.
James A. Garfield

“You may pray to God to remove the hills on your way and fill every pothole on your path; but don’t be surprised if God gives you a shovel to do so!”
Israelmore Ayivor

“Use the hills to get stronger!”
― Mehmet Murat ildan