Tag Archives: Non-traumatic fatalities in football

American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine study: Over-conditioning kills: Non-traumatic fatalities in football is preventable

13 Jul

@Life360 discussed the dangers of participating in sports in The Hidden Dangers of Competitive Sports:

I think Wall identifies the real danger of sports on your health — long-term injuries. While we’re most likely to think of sprains and broken bones, teens are able to recover from those well; it’s damages that affect growth which should be of more concern.
We can all agree that sports nurture a positive discipline for exercise, but it’s easy for that regiment to go too far. Personally, I’ve seen competitive sports spur unhealthy habits. In high school, I was on the wrestling team in the winter and rowing team in the spring. Since weight is such an important issue with both of those sports, I was encouraged to watch what I ate very carefully. While my coaches never suggested making unhealthy changes to my diet, there is often an unspoken pressure for young athletes to do so. That’s not to say that wrestling and rowing are bad sports (in fact, I’d argue the opposite), but in a competitive atmosphere, even high school kids can take things too seriously. Eating disorders from sports isn’t all that uncommon.
Though I’ve only discussed the cons of high school athletics, I still think the positives — both physical and mental — outweigh the negatives. But I think both young athletes and their parents should be aware of the dangers, and understand when to realize that they’re taking sports too seriously. https://www.life360.com/blog/the-hidden-dangers-of-competitive-sports/

American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine released a study which examined the dangers of over-conditioning.

Science Daily reported in Over-conditioning kills: Non-traumatic fatalities in football is preventable:

Most non-traumatic fatalities among high school and college football athletes do not occur while playing the game of football, but rather during conditioning sessions which are often associated with overexertion or punishment drills required by coaches and team staff, according to research presented today at the American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting. The research was presented by Dr. Barry P. Boden of The Orthopaedic Center, Rockville, Md.

Football is associated with the highest number of fatalities of any high school or college sport, but the number of traumatic injuries incurred while playing football have declined significantly since the 1960s.
However, the annual number of non-traumatic fatalities has stayed constant with current rates that are two to three times higher than traumatic fatalities.
Heat and sickle cell trait fatality rates were compared pre- and post-implementation of the NCAA football acclimatization model in 2003 and sickle cell screening policies implemented in 2010, respectively.
Boden and his team reviewed 187 non-traumatic football fatalities that occurred between 1998 and 2018. The researchers obtained information from extensive internet searches, as well as depositions, investigations, autopsies, media and freedom of information reports.
Of the 187 fatalities, more than half (52 percent) were due to cardiac issues; 24 percent were caused by heat; and five percent from asthma.
“The majority of deaths occurred outside of the regular season months of September through December, with the most common month for fatalities being August,” Boden reported.
Boden said many of the fatalities had three issues in common: the conditioning sessions were supervised by the football coach or strength and conditioning coach; irrationally intense workouts and/or punishment drills were scheduled; and an inadequate medical response was implemented…. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/07/190713103944.htm

Citation:

Over-conditioning kills: Non-traumatic fatalities in football is preventable
Date: July 13, 2019
Source: American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine
Summary:
Most non-traumatic fatalities among high school and college football athletes do not occur while playing the game of football, but rather during conditioning sessions which are often associated with overexertion or punishment drills required by coaches and team staff, according to new research.

Here is the press release from American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine:

July 13, 2019
Over-conditioning kills: Non-traumatic fatalities in football is preventable

by American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine

Most non-traumatic fatalities among high school and college football athletes do not occur while playing the game of football, but rather during conditioning sessions which are often associated with overexertion or punishment drills required by coaches and team staff, according to research presented today at the American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting. The research was presented by Dr. Barry P. Boden of The Orthopaedic Center, Rockville, Md.
Football is associated with the highest number of fatalities of any high school or college sport, but the number of traumatic injuries incurred while playing football have declined significantly since the 1960s.
However, the annual number of non-traumatic fatalities has stayed constant with current rates that are two to three times higher than traumatic fatalities.
Heat and sickle cell trait fatality rates were compared pre- and post-implementation of the NCAA football acclimatization model in 2003 and sickle cell screening policies implemented in 2010, respectively.
Boden and his team reviewed 187 non-traumatic football fatalities that occurred between 1998 and 2018. The researchers obtained information from extensive internet searches, as well as depositions, investigations, autopsies, media and freedom of information reports.
Of the 187 fatalities, more than half (52 percent) were due to cardiac issues; 24 percent were caused by heat; and five percent from asthma.
“The majority of deaths occurred outside of the regular season months of September through December, with the most common month for fatalities being August,” Boden reported.
Boden said many of the fatalities had three issues in common: the conditioning sessions were supervised by the football coach or strength and conditioning coach; irrationally intense workouts and/or punishment drills were scheduled; and an inadequate medical response was implemented.
The average annual rate of heat-related fatalities remained unchanged at the collegiate level pre- and post-implementation of the NCAA football acclimatization model in 2003. The average annual number of sickle cell trait deaths in collegiate football declined 58 percent after the 2010 NCAA sickle cell screening policies were implemented. At the high school level, where there are no sickle cell guidelines, the number of sickle cell fatalities increased 400 percent since 2010.
The football acclimatization model implemented by the NCAA in 2003 has failed at reducing exertional heat-related fatalities at the collegiate level. Sickle cell trait screening policies adopted by the NCAA in 2010 have been effective at reducing fatalities in college athletes and similar guidelines should be mandated at the high school level.
“Conditioning-related fatalities are preventable by establishing standards in workout design, holding coaches and strength and conditioning coaches accountable, ensuring compliance with current policies, and allowing athletic health care providers complete authority over medical decisions,” Boden reported.

Explore further
Athletes with sickle cell traits are at more risk to collapse: here’s why
More information: http://www.sportsmed.org/aossmimis/me … AM2019-Abstracts.pdf
Provided by American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine

Faye Reid wrote in Moderation And Fitness | What Is The Balance?

The fact of the matter is that while an extreme and explosive shred workout is a great thing, it becomes useless without moderation. Regardless of what your goals are, sustainability has to at least be somewhere in your priority list. Whether you are training for a sports match, a competition, or for summer, one would generally want to be able to get back into the gym after completing such a goal. But where one trains with ferocity without moderation, injuries and burn-outs leave a fitness career with an early death.
The most important ingredients to a good training regime can all by injected with a healthy dose of moderation to ensure sustainability and longevity…. https://www.myprotein.com/thezone/training/moderation-and-fitness-what-is-the-balance/

The choicest pleasures of life lie within the ring of moderation.
Benjamin Disraeli

The Sports Concussion Institute has some great information about concussions http://www.concussiontreatment.com/concussionfacts.html

Resources:

Concussions
http://kidshealth.org/teen/safety/first_aid/concussions.html#a_What_Is_a_Concussion_and_What_Causes_It_

Concussion
http://www.emedicinehealth.com/concussion/article_em.htm

Concussion – Overview
http://www.webmd.com/brain/tc/traumatic-brain-injury-concussion-overview

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