Bimbos, himbos, and role models

28 Nov

Miley Cyrus is sucking up publicity oxygen again. The UK’s Daily Mail is reporting in the article, ‘I’m a stoner’: Miley Cyrus confesses that she smokes ‘too much weed’ when given a Bob Marley birthday cake:

‘You know you’re a stoner when your friends make you a Bob Marley cake,’ the former Disney starlet said in video obtained by The Daily. ‘You know you smoke way too much f**king weed!’

The bash was held at Beacher’s Madhouse inside the Roosevelt Hotel in Los Angeles on Tuesday which was attended and hosted by her friend Kelly Osbourne, 27.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-2066885/Miley-Cyrus-confesses-smokes-weed-given-Bob-Marley-birthday-cake.html#ixzz1eyDl4dZa

The term “bimbo” comes to mind.

For parents of daughters, the Urban Dictionary defines bimbo

1. A girl who is stupid, wears lots of make up and is obsessed with boys and clothes. Generally blonde but there are exceptions. Usually hang around iwith other bimbos. You can spot them because they will be     the big group of girls that all look the same and are giggling hysterically.

2. Woman who is not attractive enough to be a model, not intelligent enough to be an actress, and not nice enough to be a poisonous snake.

3. A very stupid woman; an airhead.

Parents of sons, don’t snicker because you have sons, you too can or should be equally embarrassed by your progeny. The Urban Dictionary defines himbo

1. The male version of a bimbo, whore, or slut.
He’s such a himbo that he’d sleep with anything that has, or had, a pulse.

2. He’s hot but the conversation goes nowhere as he is a total himbo

3.. He is such a himbo, can’t talk to save his life, but what a body!

The concern for parents should be that the child overemphasizes appearance and stifles the development of other parts of their personality. Most parents want their children to be healthy and happy individuals who are balanced in their life views.

CNN ran a report on the Miss Bimbo website. In the report, Alarm As Dolls Get Breast Implants in ‘Miss Bimbo Game CNN describes some of the views expressed at the Miss Bimbo site:

Girls are encouraged to compete against each other to become the “hottest,
coolest, most famous bimbo in the whole world.”

When a girl signs up, they are given a naked virtual character to look after and
pitted against other girls to earn “bimbo” dollars so they can dress her in sexy
outfits and take her clubbing.

They are told “stop at nothing,” even “meds or plastic surgery,” to ensure their dolls win.

Users are given missions, including securing plastic surgery at the game’s
clinic to give their dolls bigger breasts, and they have to keep her at her
target weight with diet pills, which cost 100 bimbo dollars.

Breast implants sell at 11,500 bimbo dollars and net the buyer 2,000 bimbo
attitudes, making her more popular on the site.

And bagging a billionaire boyfriend is the most desirable way to earn the all
important “mula” or bimbo dollars
.

Working, it seems, is a bit of a chore in bimbo world.
The site says: “Bimbo dollars is ‘the cabbage,’ ‘bread,’ the ‘mula’ you’ll need
to buy nice things and to get by in bimbo world. To earn some bimbo cash you
will have to (gasp) work or find a boyfriend to be your sugar daddy and hook you up with a phat expense account!”

The advice on feeding the dolls is even more spurious, encouraging them to feed the dolls “every now and then” even though they want to keep their Bimbos “waif thin.” [Emphasis Added]    

It is really no wonder that Tiger Woods and others like him are able to really “score” bimbo totals. 

The Barna Group researched teen role models and posted their findings in the article, Teen Role Models: Who They Are, Why They Matter:

The nationwide sample of teenagers asked 13- to 17-year-olds to identify the person whom they admire most today as a role model, other than their parents. A follow-up question probed the reasons they define that person as a role model…

So who do teenagers name as their role models? Even while limiting the answers to non-parents, family members still comes out on top. The most commonly mentioned role model is a relative—37% of teens named a relation other than their parent as the person they admire most. This is typically a grandparent, but also includes sisters, brothers, cousins, aunts, and uncles.

After “family,” teens mention teachers and coaches (11%), friends (9%), and pastors or other religious leaders they know personally (6%).

Notice that a majority of teens indicated that the people they most admire and imitate are those with whom they maintain a personal connection, friendship, or interaction….

Respondents described a wide range of reasons why they named a particular role model. The most common rationale (26%) was the personality traits of that person (e.g., caring about others, being loving and polite, being courageous, and being fun were some of the characteristics mentioned most often). Another factor in teens’ thinking was finding someone to emulate (22%) or that the teen would like to “follow in the footsteps” of their chosen role model.

http://www.barna.org/teens-next-gen-articles/467-teen-role-models#.TtL87OprkhU.email

Dr. Robyn Silverman has an excellent article, Powerful Role Models: Seven Ways to Make a Positive Impact on Children, which is posted at her web site.

Positive role models;

  1. Model positive choice-making: Little eyes are watching and little ears are listening. When it comes to being a role model, you must be aware that the choices you make don’t only impact you but also the children who regard you as their superhero…..
  1. Think out loud: When you have a tough choice to make, allow the children to see how you work through the problem, weight the pros and cons, and come to a decision. The process of making a good decision is a skill. A good role model will not only show a child which decision is best, but also how they to come to that conclusion. That way, the child will be able to follow that reasoning when they are in a similar situation.
  1. Apologize and admit mistakes: Nobody’s perfect. When you make a bad choice, let those who are watching and learning from you know that you made a mistake and how you plan to correct it. This will help them to understand that (a) everyone makes mistakes; (b) it’s not the end of the world; (c) you can make it right; and (d) you should take responsibility for it as soon as possible. By apologizing, admitting your mistake, and repairing the damage, you will be demonstrating an important yet often overlooked part of being a role model….
  1. Follow through: We all want children to stick with their commitments and follow through with their promises. However, as adults, we get busy, distracted, and sometimes, a bit lazy. To be a good role model, we must demonstrate stick-to-itiveness and self discipline. That means; (a) be on time; (b) finish what you started; (c) don’t quit; (d) keep your word; and (e) don’t back off when things get challenging. When role models follow through with their goals, it teaches children that it can be done and helps them adopt an “if s/he can do it, so can I” attitude.
  1. Show respect: You may be driven, successful, and smart but whether you choose to show respect or not speaks volumes about the type of attitude it takes to make it in life. We always tell children to “treat others the way we want to be treated” and yet, may not subscribe to that axiom ourselves. Do you step on others to get ahead?
  1. Be well rounded: While we don’t want to spread ourselves too thin, it’s important to show children that we can be more than just one thing. Great role models aren’t just “parents” or “teachers.” They’re people who show curiosities and have varied interests. They’re great learners and challenge themselves to get out of their comfort zones….
  1. Demonstrate confidence in who you are: Whatever you choose to do with your life, be proud of the person you’ve become and continue to become. It may have been a long road and you may have experienced bumps along the way, but it’s the responsibility of a role model to commemorate the lessons learned, the strength we’ve amassed, and the character they’ve developed. We can always get better, however, in order for children to celebrate who they are, their role models need to show that confidence doesn’t start “5 pounds from now,” “2 more wins on top of this one,” or “1 more possession than I have today.” We must continue to strive while being happy with how far we’ve come at the same time.

http://www.drrobynsilverman.com/parenting-tips/powerful-role-models-seven-ways-to-make-a-positive-impact-on-children/

Stephen Perrine has a good article, How To Bimbo Proof Your Daughter  which is also good advice for sons.  The point is parents must engage their children and offer them alternatives to the culture which is trying to turn children into Snooki, Miley, Lindsey, and Paris clones. Remember that education which includes not only the academic, but positive role models is a partnership between the student, parent(s) or guardian(s), teacher(s), and school. All parties must be involved and engaged.

Dr. Wilda says this about that ©

One Response to “Bimbos, himbos, and role models”

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. California high school: The ‘fantasy slut league’ « Comments From An Old Fart - October 25, 2012

    […] Bimbos, himbos, and role models                                        https://drwilda.com/2011/11/28/bimbos-himbos-and-role-models/ […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: